Oxford City in the 1930s

Oxford in the 1930s was growing. It was in 1929 that the boundaries of the city had extended to include Summertown, Wolvercote, Headington, Cowley and Iffley – all of which saw new houses being built. Botley, North Hinksey and Cumnor Hill also saw new development.

There was plenty of manufacturing in and around Oxford in the 30s – a lot of it related to car production. Morris Motors had moved to Cowley in 1910 and opened a factory near Abingdon in the 1920s. In the 1920s Oxford had also seen growth in the printing and publishing industries. Much of the new infrastructure that was being built in the 1930s was due to an increase in the population of the city as people went there to work.

As well as the University of Oxford there was also the Oxford City Technical School and School of Art which were merged with John Henry Brookes as Principle in 1934, becoming the Schools of Technology, Art and Commerce. Now Oxford Brookes University, they did not have any main site (they didn’t move to Headington until 1949) but was instead based in several small sites around the city offering students learning in both arts and science subjects.

Oxford City in the 1930s

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